SEEK: Salford Environment for Expertise and Knowledge
Dr Julie Morton
Dr Julie Morton
postal addressUniversity of Salford, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, Allerton Building, The Crescent , Salford, M5 4WT.
email addressj.w.morton@salford.ac.uk
telephone0161 2952054
Key Memberships
Member of School: School of Health & Society
From September 2011 to present.
Full Member of Research Institute: Institute for Health & Social Care Research (IHSCR)
From April 2007 to May 2009.
Profile Summary

Recent publications:

 

 Dharman Jeyasingham & Julie Morton (2019) How is ‘racism’ understood in literature about black and minority ethnic social work students in Britain? A conceptual review, Social Work Education, DOI: 10.1080/02615479.2019.1584176

 Morton, J. (2018) ‘“Text-work” in Research Ethics Review: The significance of documents in and beyond committee meetings’, Accountability In Research, 25(7–8), pp. 387–403. doi: 10.1080/08989621.2018.1537790.

 Forthcoming:

 Morton, J. & O’Reilly, M. “Mental health, big data and research ethics: Parity of esteem in mental health from a UK perspective”, Clinical Ethics

 

 


 

 

 

Julie Morton is a Senior Lecturer in social work and teaches citical professional practice (theory and policy), research ethics and use of theory for social work. Before entering higher education she was in practice as an Approved Social Worker in mental health working in statutory agencies in the North West of England.

Her PhD was a study of the 'everyday' work of NHS Research Ethics Committes carried out with the support of the  National Research Ethics Service (NRES), The focus of the study was the operationalisation and conceptualisation of capacity and consent in current ethical review processes using institutional ethnography.

Her other research interest is in the development of innovative practice in teaching and learning about race and sexuality on social work programmes.

Julie has lead curriculum development and design (for  the MA in qualfying social work, the  Msc in Applied Social Work/CPD for qualified social workers and the MA in Social Pedagogy). Julie also developed a CPD framework for qualified social workers in conjunction with partner agencies.

 Recent activites/publications:

https://www.healthinnovationmanchester.com/mental-health-data-sensitive-physical-heath-data/

Public engagement debate (University of Manchester)

Julie is currently engaged in collaboartive research with the University of Manchester and OsloMet on the experiences of BME students on qualifying programmes.

 

HRA Summary for participants

Ethical regulation in general and ethicsreview more specifically are perceived as challenging for researchers and have been subject to critique from both qualitative and quantitative research paradigms. Existing critique clusters around the following themes:

Bureaucracy and its impact on research. Authors here suggest that there are unacceptable delays in receiving decisions on ethics in review or that the requirements of review are excessive, unachievable and constitute a barrier to research.  (Dingwall, 2006; Hammersley, 2010; Stewart et al (2008).

Dominance of quantitative research paradigms. There is perceived lack of understanding of qualitative research and quantitative ‘bias’ (Burrr and Reynolds (2010); Murphy and Dingwall, 2007; Hammersley, 2009, 2010). Alongside critics of the system, particularly in the social sciences, other commentators have identified the potential educative value of engaging with review systems (Wiles,2012; Guillemin and Gillam, 2004; Israel and Hay, 2006) despite acknowledging some of the (historic) limitations in relation to qualitative research paradigms.

Centrality of the informed consent requirement. This has been problematised from a range of perspectives which view it as unachievable in some methodologies, as necessary but problematic, or as an overly bureaucratic requirement which makes it informed but not necessarily genuine (O’Neill, 2003). The shortcomings of procedural consent in medicine and biomedical contexts and which also relate to consent in research ethics have been highlighted by philosophers (O’Neill 2003; Kittay, 2007; Manson and O’Neil, 2007) while sociologists have commented on the potential privileging of consent over other ethical considerations and described informed consent as an ‘ethical panacea’ (Corrigan, 2003). Furthermore, the importan

Key Qualifications
1982
1991
2004
2003
0
Key Projects
Key Presence
Conference Organisation
2012
May

Symposium with international contributions form guest presenters.

Succesful bid to the Higher Education Authority 'Seminar Series' stream has secured funding for this event.

2007
Oct
Conference Presentations
2015
Jul
2015
Jul
2014
Jul
2014
Jul

 Co-presented with Steve Myers, University of Salford

2012
Sep

co-authored with Dharman Jeyasingham

2012
Jul

Co-authored with ... more >>.

2009
Jul

With Dharman Jeyasingham

2008
Sep
2006
Aug
JUSWEC (Joint Universities Social Work Education Conference) Paper 'Mental Health Social Work in Crisis : Perceptions of Staff in a Crisis Resolution Team'
2006
Jul
JUSWEC (Joint Universities Social Work Education Conference) Paper (with Dharman Jeyasingham) ''Challenging and Changing the Teaching of Anti-oppressive Practice''
2006
Feb
Making Research Count Conference Social Work in the Third Millenium Workshop (with Dharman Jeyasingham) 'Rethinking Anti-oppressive Practice'
External Examiner Duties
2016
Aug

 MSc Mental Health (AMHP and BIA)

2015
Jun

 MSc Safeguarding

Other Evidence of External Esteem
2017
Nov

 Organised by University of Manchester, Public Engagement and Involvement. 
With the Health eResearch Centre
more >>.

2009
Sep

ongoing

Reviewer for the following journals:

Research Ethics

Nursing Ethics

Journal of Social Work

Ethics and Social Welfare

Other Research Activity
2019
Evaluation of a crisis resolution service in secondary mental health services. Bolton directorate of the Bolton, Salford and Trafford Mental Health Trust.