SEEK: Salford Environment for Expertise and Knowledge
Dr Michael Nevell
Dr Michael Nevell
postal addressPeel Building, Crescent, Salford, United Kingdom, M5 4NW.
email addressM.D.Nevell@salford.ac.uk
telephone0161 295 3825
website addresshttp://www.salford.ac.uk/built-environment/research/applied-archaeology
Key Memberships
From September 2009 to September 2010.
From March 2015 to present.
From September 2009 to March 2015.
Full Member of Research Centre: Ecosystems and Environment Research Centre
From September 2015 to present.
From October 2013 to August 2015.
Full Member of Research Centre: Management in Construction Research Centre (MIC)
From October 2009 to October 2013.
Associate Member of Research Centre: Salford Centre for Research and Innovation (SCRI)
From October 2009 to August 2015.
Profile Summary

I am Head of Archaeology and Head of the Centre for Applied Archaeology in the School of Enivronment Life Sciences. I have over 28 years experience as a professional archaeologist. This includes undergraduate and post-graduate teaching in Industrial Archaeology, buildings archaeology and Roman Archaeology; the promotion of and research into community archaeology in the UK, and archaeological consultancy, particularly as regards recording buildings archaeologically and undertaking rescue excavations through the planning process. My special interests include the archaeology of industrialsiation and archaeological theory, buildings archaeology, community archaeology and the Romano-British landscape.

The Archaeology of the Industrial Period

I have a great and active interest in the archaeology of the industrial period and the origins of industrialisation, particularly in Britain and North West England, and how models developed here might be applicable to industrialisation in other countries, especially Europe and North America. This approach was encapsulated in the Manchester Methodology, first proposed in 1999 (Nevell & Walker 1999) and since developed as a way of organizing the landscape archaeological data for industrialisation and linking this to contemporary social structures (Nevell & Walker 2004; Nevell 2005a; Nevell 2005b; Nevell 2008 a & b; Palmer, Nevell & Sissons 2012). This has been influential in developing the social side of industrial archaeology studies. From 1990 until 2011 I ran the Tameside Archaeological Survey and the Warburton Archaeological Survey both of which have been examining the origins and development of industrialisation in two different topographical zones of Greater Manchester. The Tameside survey led to the publication of 16 local archaeology and history volumes on the borough. I have undertaken individual industrial building studies in Cheshire, Cumbria, Derbyshire, Greater Manchester and Lancashire, industrial period landscape surveys in Bury MBC, Cumbria, Lancashire, Manchester City, Tameside MBC, and Trafford MBC and taught post-graduate and extra-mural courses on the subject. Particular interests include textiles mills, finishing works, warehousing and distribution, workers’ housing landscapes and above all the origins and process of industrialisation with its economic and social transformations. I have co-organised national Industrial Archaeology Conferences in January 2000, October 2001, August 2007, and November 2012, and atteneded international Industrial Archaeology Conferences in 2001, 2012 and 2013, and am currently Chairman of the CBA North West Industrial Archaeology Panel, co-editor of Industrial Archaeology Review - the leading international journal for Industrial Archaeology - a committee member of  the Association of Industrial Archaeologists and founding editor of Industrial Archaeology North West, the first regional journal on this subject in North West England. I was co-editor of two volumes on the regional research framework for North west England, which had two major chapters on Post-Medieval and Industrial Archaeology (Brennand with Chitty & Nevell 2006 & 2007). In 2008 I wrote a synthetic volume on tharchaeologyand idustrialisdation of the city of Manchester (Nevell 2008), and have authrored a simialtr volume ont he industrial archaoelogy fo Glasgow which is in press. I have published several site-specific archaeology volumes on this subject (Nevell 1993; Nevell 1997; Nevell 1998; Nevell & Walker 1999; Nevell, Roberts & Smith 1999), three synthetic volumes (McNeil & Nevell 2000; Nevell & George 2007), a further, theory-based, volume looking at the process of industrialization and its social implications (Nevell 2003), three major international article on the future direction of Industrial Archaeology (2005a, 2006a, 2008a & b), and many articles on industrialization for edited volumes and international journals (Nevell 2005b, 2006b, 2009a, 2010, 2012).

 

Buildings Archaeology in the UK

 

My interest in buildings archaeology includes both industrial buildings (textile mills, bleaching and printworks and cornmills) and vernacular buildings (timber-framed buildings and farmsteads, and weavers’ cottages), with the emphasis on the use of social space, the recovery of a building’s function through combining both the archaeological and written record and experimenting in new forms of digital recording. I am current Chair of the IfA Buildings Archaeology special interest group. I have undertaken several landscape and thematic building research surveys from the Old Market Place in Altrincham and vernacular buildings of Dunham Massey and Warburton, to the buildings of the hatting industry in Britain, timber-framed churches in the UK, and the textile mills of Cumberland. I have produced many specialist reports on individual vernacular and industrial buildings in the North West (more than 40 individual studies of textile mills and more than 30 on timber buildings), and run conferences on buildings in 2001 and 2004 and a series of industrial buildings seminars for the Association for Industrial Archaeology and the Council for British Archaeology from 2008 to 2010. I have published articles and booklets on individual buildings (Burke & Nevell 1996; Nevell 1999c; Nevell 2000a; McNeil & Nevell 2001; Nevell 2002) and I have co-authored several regional volumes on building types from hat works and timber-framed churches (Nevell & Walker 2001; Nevell & Walker 2002; Nevell & Hradil 2005a; Nevell & Hradil 2005b; Nevell with Grimsditch & King 2006; Nevell with Grimsditch & Hradil 2007) to cruck-framed buildings (2010) and castles (2012). The study of standing monuments and industrial urban landscape was central to my recently published book on the archaeology of Manchester (Nevell 2008) and to the CBA Handbook of Industrial Archjaeology, published in 2012 (Palmer, Nevell & Sissons 2012).

 

Key Qualifications
1993

Thesis title ‘Settlement and Society in the Mersey Basin c 2000 BC to c AD 400’

1986

Thesis title ‘Late Prehistoric and Romano-British Settlement in North-east Cheshire’.

1984
Key Projects
2016
Apr
2012
Sep
Archaeological Evaluation - Worsley New Hall (Phase 2)
The Peel Group, £10,440.00.
Principal Investigator: M Nevell (100%).
2011
Oct
Dig Greater Manchester
Association of Greater Manchester Authorities (AGMA), £427,053.00.
Principal Investigator: M Nevell (100%).
2011
Apr
Archaeological Evaluation - Worsley New Hall (Phase 1)
The Peel Group, £10,440.00.
Principal Investigator: M Nevell (100%).
2010
Jan
Heritage Access for All: Ordsall Hall Pilot
Salford City Council, £10,000.00.
Principal Investigator: M Nevell (100%).
Key Publications
Authored Books
Refereed Journal Articles
Other Journal Articles
Book Sections
Edited Books
Papers in Published Conference Proceedings
Published Conference Proceedings
Key Presence
External Examiner Duties
2012
Jun

External PhD examiner.

2011
Jul

External MPhil examiner

2009
Oct

I was an external archaeology examiner for post-graduate studies in Historic Archaeology at UCC between 2009 and 2012.

Invited Papers and Lectures
2014
Dec
2014
Sep
2013
Jun
2013
May

A one day national conference on the physical changes to Manchester... more >>.

2012
Oct

Plenary lecture for the industrial archaeology and conservations session of a four day international conference.

2011
Apr
2010
Sep
2009
Jun
2009
Mar
Journal Editorship
2014
Jan

Editorial Board member

2010
Jan

Industrial Archaeology Review is the leading international peer-reviewed journal for Industrial Archaeology. It is published twice a year.

Memberships of External Bodies
2007
Sep
1992
Dec
Other
2012
Mar

Member of the International Congress on Science and Technology for the Conservation of Cultural Heritage

2011
Nov

more >>.

Other Evidence of External Esteem
2014
Jul

Runner up for Best Archaeological Project 2014 (Tameside Archaeological Survey)

2013
Nov