SEEK: Salford Environment for Expertise and Knowledge

Poster Presentation
September 2010

12/12 school kids enjoy Emergency Planning gaming

Mooney, J & Driscoll, P & Griffiths, L 2010, '12/12 school kids enjoy Emergency Planning gaming', Exhibited at: The Annual national conference of the College of Emergency Medicine (CEM) "Learning From Each Other: Civilian And Military Emergency Care", International Convention Centre, Birmingham, UK, From 13/09/2010 To 15/12/2010.

Abstract

In producing bespoke Emergency Planning software we have enhanced Major Incident tabletop exercises, moving from physical models to an interactive computer-based system incorporating a serious games philosophy.  We put our serious gaming software into the hands of serious gamers – a group of students from Woodhey High School, Bury, to see how they would apply their skills in an unfamiliar context. 

As part of a School Report made by the school and filmed by the BBC, the students used pilot software developed, by the authors, to assist the Emergency Medical Planning Team for the 2010 World Cup in South Africa [1].

Of the 12 students participating in this exercise, 4 performed the role of Silver Command and 8 triaged casualties resulting from a hypothetical Major Incident.  The students worked in separate rooms communicating via radios to orchestrate and manage the incident.  Observational and audit data were collated regarding software usability and understanding gained by the students of the tasks undertaken.

All of the students, who play computer games on a weekly, or more frequent, basis, found the user interface: fit for purpose; clear and easy to navigate.  All of the Silver Commanders strongly agreed that they understood and felt confident in their roles.  In the Triaging team, while all of the students responded positively, fewer strongly affirmed their understanding and confidence.  When asked what they had learned, the students commented on: triage use; task managemen; how stressful a ‘real life’ exercise would be and their perceived beneficial use of gaming in Major Incident preparation.

In conclusion, we took a bespoke medical training application and asked medically-naive ‘professional gamers’ to trial it’s software credentials.  The students’ reported positively on usability and successfully utilised the software to complete their allotted tasks.  Feedback from this exercise will be applied in future Emergency Planning modelling. 

References:

1.       BBC News School Report, broadcast on Northwest Tonight 10/03/2010. “Can a computer game save lives?” http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/8558244.stm

Authors

SEEK Members

External Authors

Jane Mooney

Pete Driscoll

Publication Details

Exhibited At
The Annual national conference of the College of Emergency Medicine (CEM) "Learning From Each Other: Civilian And Military Emergency Care", International Convention Centre, Birmingham, UK

Dates
From 13/09/2010 to 15/12/2010.