SEEK: Salford Environment for Expertise and Knowledge

Working Paper
April 2011

The Hive in The Cliff: A Case Study in Intergenerational Relations and Culturally Led Regeneration.

Fairhurst, E & Slee, S M 2011, The Hive in The Cliff: A Case Study in Intergenerational Relations and Culturally Led Regeneration., unpublished Conference paper, New Cultures of Ageing: Narratives, Fiction, Methods and Researching the Future, London, UK.

Abstract

The Hive in the Cliff aims to initiate social and economic renewal in Broughton, Salford through a culturally led regeneration and conservation programme.   Responding to a range of substantial community needs, The Hive in The Cliff favours community-based approaches to understand and react to the ways these needs affect local people, using active engagement through diverse creative projects. The Hive in The Cliff incorporates an interdisciplinary academic team and partner organisations, developing methodologies that specifically utilise creative and heritage-based activities to instigate social-economic change. An emerging case study, The Hive in The Cliff has gained significant support and momentum in its early stages, including support by the Vice-Chancellor’s Iconic City of Salford Award and a £10,000 research grant.
 
Whilst the overall project addresses the role of cultural activities in regeneration, this paper specifically addresses how such a concern embraces relations between generations. Recognising that regeneration is more than a matter of the physical environment was the impetus behind a recently completed HEFCE funded programme, Urban Regeneration: Making a Difference. One of those projects which focused on the role of older people in deliberative forums, outlined how different generations learnt from each other. (Fairhurst et al 2009). In other words, knowledge was transferred between and across generations. We will show how, and in what ways, knowledge, such as local history of people and places, is made knowable and preserved through culturally activities involving different generations. The paper concludes by noting the problematics of equating the category of generation with chronological age and suggests that a focus on identities is a more fruitful way forward for examining intergenerational relations and culturally led regeneration. 

Publication Details

Type
Conference paper

Publisher
New Cultures of Ageing: Narratives, Fiction, Methods and Researching the Future
London , UK.